Receipts grow

More paying inheritance tax as thresholds frozen

housing for sale
Tax bills are rising for those inheriting property (pic: Terry Murden)

More families are being dragged into paying inheritance tax as new data reveals the Treasury raked in another £4.1 billion in the months between April and October this year.

This is £500 million more than in the same period a year earlier and is revealed just days after the Autumn Statement in which it was announced that the inheritance tax threshold of £325,000 will be frozen until April 2028. 

While the average bill is currently £216,000, research conducted by Wealth Club shows the average inheritance tax bills are conservatively estimated to reach £297,793 by 2025-26 and £336,605 by 2027-28. 

Alex Davies, CEO and founder of Wealth Club said: “There has been a total u-turn on inheritance tax over the last few months. From Liz Truss raising the hopes of the nation with a cut back in September, and now Jeremy Hunt announcing the extension of the freeze until 2028.

“This is another stealth tax and the case of the boiling frog is apt. The treasury hopes by leaving rates and allowances unchanged, inflation can do the hard work of turning the temperature up on tax payers without them noticing. 

“Contrary to what many think, inheritance tax doesn’t just affect the super-rich. It will be the thousands of hardworking families that will bear the brunt.

“Rampant inflation, soaring house prices and years of frozen allowances will magnify the tax take in the years ahead. More and more families are going to find themselves hit by death duties they might not expected or planned for.”

How inheritance tax is calculated

  • Inheritance tax (IHT) of 40% is usually chargeable if one’s assets exceed a certain threshold, after deducting any liabilities, exemptions and reliefs.
  • The threshold (nil rate band) has been £325,000 per single person since 6 April 2009 – and will stay frozen at this level up to and including 2028-29.
  • There is an additional transferrable main residence nil rate band of £175,000 available when passing the family home down to children or other direct descendants.
  • Any unused threshold may be transferred to a surviving spouse or civil partner. So, a couple could currently potentially pass on up to £1 million before IHT might apply.


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