Investment falls

Anti-car policies have seen road spending plunge

Holes in roads, potholes
Crumbling roads are a cause of motorists’ anger (pic: Terry Murden)

Spending on major road infrastructure by the SNP-Green government has plummeted by 95% in the last six years, according to new data.

Figures obtained by the Scottish Conservatives via a Freedom of Information request, reveal that investment on such projects fell from £502million in 2016/17 to just £26m in 2022/23

The Tories say this decline is direct result of the SNP’s deals with the Scottish Greens which has led to decisions not to upgrade key trunk routes, including the A9 and A96.

Shadow transport minister Graham Simpson said: “The SNP have presided over a quite staggering fall in investment which indicates their complete contempt for, and betrayal of, Scotland’s motorists.

“They have abandoned all pretence of keeping their promises on upgrading vital routes, and instead pandered to the anti-car agenda of their extremist Green colleagues.

“These appalling figures explain the SNP’s pitiful delays in dualling the A9 and A96, which have so enraged people in rural Scotland who rely on these key trunk routes.

“Humza Yousaf had the cheek to claim in March that he was ‘baffled’ as to why the Nairn bypass had not been completed, when his government have decimated road spending.

“Their failure to provide the necessary investment in our roads betrays local communities, undermines Scotland’s future connectivity and endangers lives.

“And, as usual with this government, it’s rural and remote Scotland that suffers disproportionately from their failings.”

SNP ministers have blamed shortfalls in UK government funding for the reduction in the amount it is able to spend on major road projects.

The Scottish government admitted that it would take until 2035 to dual the A9 at a cost of £3.7 billion. The SNP had initially pledged to complete the stretch by 2025. Màiri McAllan, the net zero secretary, admitted that the project had “faced challenges” and had “not progressed at the pace we would have liked”.

The Scottish government admitted that it would take until 2035 to dual the A9 at a cost of £3.7 billion. The SNP had initially pledged to complete the stretch by 2025. Màiri McAllan, the net zero secretary, admitted that the project had “faced challenges” and had “not progressed at the pace we would have liked”.

Spending on roads: (Transport Scotland)

These figures do not include specific spending on the A9 dualling project to Inverness – but include other spending invested into maintaining the A9. This is because Transport Scotland provided road spending figures in the freedom of information request without A9 dualling spend.



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked as *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.