Shop workers blow

Tesco puts 1,600 jobs at risk as night shifts axed

Some staff will be offered other roles

Tesco has announced a second round of cutbacks within 24 hours that will put 1,600 jobs at risk.

Britain’s biggest supermarket chain said it will replace its overnight stock replenishment to daytime trading hours in 36 large stores and 49 convenience stores. In 37 stores, It will also convert its petrol stations to pay-at-pump during overnight hours.

Yesterday the company announced the closure of seven Jack’s stores and the removal of some counters.

Together the changes will put around 1,600 roles at risk of redundancy across our business. The company aims to offer alternative roles to those affected.

It currently has about 3,000 vacancies across the business, and it said it will work individually with each affected colleague to support them during this period of change and help them to find another role.

During the pandemic the company hired thousands of additional workers as people were eating more at home.

UK and Ireland CEO, Jason Tarry said: “We operate in a highly competitive and fast-paced market and our customers are shopping differently, especially since the start of the pandemic.

“We are always looking at how we can run our business as simply and efficiently as possible, so that we can re-invest in the things that matter most to customers.

“The changes we are announcing today will help us do this. Our priority now is to support our impacted colleagues through these changes and, wherever possible, find them alternative roles within our business.” 

Daniel Adams – Usdaw National Officer says: “Tesco has informed us that they are looking to undertake a number of restructures across the business that could put around 1,600 jobs at risk. Clearly this will be incredibly unsettling for those who may be affected. 

“We should not forget the role that key workers have played throughout the Coronavirus pandemic and to receive this news is devastating. 

“Usdaw will do all we can to support members throughout the process and we will fully engage in consultation with the business with a view to protecting jobs and, where this is not possible, securing the best possible deal for those affected.”

TESCO has announced more job cuts, putting 1,400 shelf stacker roles at risk.

The supermarket said it will move its overnight stock replenishment into the daytime at 85 stores, leading to job losses.

Tesco

is also converting petrol stations at 36 stores to be pay-at-pump only overnight.

In total, 1,600 jobs are at risk including 130 roles that are being axed due to the closure of seven Jack’s stores.

The supermarket said it will try and find new roles for staff, adding that it has 3,000 vacancies currently available.

The Sun yesterday revealed that the grocery giant is ditching its bargain supermarket experiment, closing seven of its 13 Jack’s stores.

The six remaining branches will be converted into Tesco superstores and it will continue to sell Jack’s branded items at its Booker corner shops.

Staff were told in a Zoom meeting yesterday that 130 head office jobs are at risk due to the closures.

Tesco is also shutting down 317 deli counters – but affected staff will be given alternative roles so no redundancies are expected due to those changes.

Tesco UK and Ireland chief executive Jason Tarry said today: “We operate in a highly competitive and fast-paced market and our customers are shopping differently, especially since the start of the pandemic.

“We are always looking at how we can run our business as simply and efficiently as possible, so that we can re-invest in the things that matter most to customers. The changes we are announcing today will help us do this.

“Our priority now is to support our impacted colleagues through these changes and, wherever possible, find them alternative roles within our business.”

Yesterday Tesco also confirmed it has no plans to bring back 24-hour openings in stores. 

The UK’s biggest supermarket chain axed 24-hour opening during the pandemic – but briefly introduced them in the run-up to Christmas 2020. 



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