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Refurbishment

Royal Mile offices to reopen as luxury apartments

Former offices, now Cheval Old Town Chambers

Redundant former council offices in Edinburgh’s Royal Mile have been transformed into luxury serviced apartments and a 140-cover restaurant.

The development, 329 High Street, by Chris Stewart Group, will be handed over to operators later this month to capitalise on the easing of restrictions on international tourism. 

The 18th century building was leased from Edinburgh City Council in 2019 now features 24 luxury serviced apartments providing an extension to Cheval Old Town Chambers, located in the nearby medieval close.

It brings the total number of short and long term lets within the development to 75.

Reception area to Cheval Old Town Chambers

The new luxury, deluxe and loft one bedroom and open plan studio apartments offer views on to the Royal Mile and St Giles’ Cathedral, or northwards across to Princes Street.

The restaurant, Luckenbooths, will be managed by The Bon Vivant Group, the company behind a number of Edinburgh venues including The Devil’s Advocate and El Cartel.

In line with all CSG developments, ‘329’, which is a listed building, has been sensitively restored, with the interiors blending heritage and existing features with contemporary design.

Cheval Old Town Chambers looks out on to St Giles’ Cathedral

Building on the collaboration first inspired by The Edinburgh Grand, CSG has worked closely with its partners Cheval Residences and The Bon Vivant Group to create a distinct brand style, which permeates through the new development.

Chris Stewart, CEO of the Chris Stewart Group said: “This has been another major transformation project for CSG. Working with the traditional façade with listed status and creating a stylish and classic interior that will stand the test of time has been a rewarding experience for the whole team.

“We are grateful to Edinburgh Council for their support throughout this project and I believe we have another development that the city can be proud of.”

The main contractor on site was Thomas Johnstone. 

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